Sarah MacLeish

Contact Information

Sarah.MacLeish2@UHHospitals.org

 

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Sarah MacLeish, DO

Assistant Professor

  • Division: Endocrinology and Metabolism

Bio

Sarah MacLeish, DO, is a pediatric endocrinologist in the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital. She is Medical Director of the Diabetes Technology Clinic and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

She is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric endocrinology. She has special interests in Type 1 diabetes, use of mobile technologies to improve diabetes care and underserved children with diabetes. Dr. MacLeish was named to the UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital medical staff in 2011.

Dr. MacLeish is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wis., with distinctive scholastic achievement, and Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, Mo. She completed a residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric endocrinology at UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital. During her residency she completed an International Health Tract and also trained at Children’s Hospital Number One, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Dr. MacLeish’s research interest is in Type 1 diabetes in children. She currently is participating in a project on improving access to intensive diabetes care for children in the Medicaid population. As a fellow she received a research award to study strategies for improving glucose control in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.

Dr. MacLeish has published articles in medical journals on Type 1 diabetes in children and is a reviewer for Children’s Health Care. She serves as a volunteer on the Medical Staff Committee for Camp Ho Mita Koda in Newbury, Ohio, a summer camp for children with diabetes.

She is a member of the Endocrine Society, American Diabetes Association, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes and Pediatric Endocrine Society.

Research Interests
• Type 1 diabetes in children