James Chmiel, MD, MPH

Contact Information

 James.Chmiel@UHHospitals.org

 

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James Chmiel, MD, MPH

Associate Professor

  • Division: Pulmonology, Allergy and Immunology

Bio

Dr. Chmiel received his M.D. and M.P.H. in Epidemiology, from the University of Michigan in 1991. He worked as a resident in Pediatrics in Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago until 1994. Dr. Chmiel then joined the Pediatrics Pulmonology group at Case Western Reserve as a fellow from 1995 to 98, where he was promoted to Instructor and then Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in 2001. In 2008, he was promoted to Associate Professor. He became Fellowship Program Director in 2001, the Associate Director of the LeRoy W. Matthews Cystic Fibrosis Center in 2004, and the Director of Clinical Affairs in 2007.

Research Interests
Dr. James Chmiel’s research involves understanding the inflammatory response of the lung, particularly as it relates to asthma and cystic fibrosis and the impact of anti-inflammatory therapeutics upon this response. Dr. Chmiel participates in both basic science and clinical research projects. His basic science research focuses on studying the link between the mutant cystic fibrosis gene in bone-marrow-derived cells and the development of the pulmonary inflammatory response in cell culture and animal models. Dr. Chmiel participates in both independent and multi-center clinical trials. Dr. Chmiel is a Co-Investigator in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Inner City Asthma Consortium. In addition, Dr. Chmiel is currently interested in evaluating outcome measures for measuring the inflammatory response in CF patients. Studies are underway evaluating the utility of induced sputum, infant pulmonary function tests, and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage as methods of characterizing the patient’s response to anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen and simvastatin. The ultimate goal of all of these studies is to develop safer, more effective anti-inflammatory therapeutics for the treatment of asthma and CF lung disease.