Department of Dermatology

Jeremy Bordeaux, M.D., M.P.H. joined Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center in 2007. Dr. Bordeaux holds a dual degree in Medicine from Duke University (MD) and Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill (MPH). He was accepted into the Dermatology Residency at the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine followed by a Mohs Micrographic Surgery and Cutaneous Oncology Fellowship prior to joining Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.

Dr. Bordeaux is the Director of the Mohs Micrographic and Dermatologic Surgery Division and Director of the Melanoma Program in the Department of Dermatology at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. Dr. Bordeaux leads the Dermatologic Surgery team at University Hospitals and specializes in all aspects of dermatologic surgery, ranging from removal of skin cancer by conventional surgical methods to the highly specialized procedure of Mohs micrographic surgery. Mohs micrographic surgery provides the greatest chance for a cure for even the most complicated skin cancers. Dr. Bordeaux is a nationally renowned expert in advanced surgical reconstruction following the removal of skin cancer. He understands and values the importance of treating skin cancer and the importance of surgical reconstruction that leaves people looking normal. Dr, Bordeaux frequently teaches and lectures nationally and internationally on advanced reconstructive techniques. Dr. Bordeaux chairs the Procedural Dermatology Section of the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) and is involved in the American College of Mohs Surgery and the America Society of Dermatologic Surgery. In addition he has authored many papers that have been published in medical journals on the topic. Dr. Bordeaux has several publications that have changed the practice of dermatologic surgery, which should change the methodology for prevention and early detection of melanoma and other skin cancers.